broken/whole: Love Came First

Graphic designed by Isaac Taleno

Graphic designed by Isaac Taleno

"For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life through Christ Jesus our Lord.”

Romans 6:23, NLT

From the cross.

To the resurrection. 

Love came first.

In our world, love can appear to be very conditional. Many times love is based on what we can do, or achieve, or show or become. But God's love is so unique and different. He knew mankind was in need of something authentic and real, so he loved us first by sending his Son.

Our heavenly father knew there was no other way. Mankind was in trouble. Sin was rapidly growing and spreading like a disease across our souls. We were trying in our own strength and in our own power to achieve forgiveness. We were following the laws and the lists but in the end still came up empty. What we were crying out for was something beyond us. Something genuine. Something not hidden by a façade. Something that was real and genuine. God knew the only way for redemption was to send his Son to cover the sin of mankind. Your sin. My sin. And while we were born into a world of sin, the sacrifice that he made by sending Jesus would be enough to free us for eternity.

That sort of love of does not have an expiration date. That sort of love does not have an end. That sort of love does not have a final chapter. That sort of love can find you wherever you are, wrap itself around your darkest moment and love you all the way through.

Understanding ‘that’ love came first is important on our journey to understanding the cross. That sort of love connects with your story, and mine. The first step in our journey to the brokenness of the cross is to understand He reached out and loved you first.

"We love because he first loved us," (1 John 4:19, NIV). God made the first move in this love story.

Take a moment to think about this amazing love that reached out first.  This love reached out to make you whole. Love is reaching…

Devotional written by Mark A. Rempel. Graphic designed by Isaac Taleno.